Gorse Hill Labour

A regular blog and updates from Mike Cordingley, Councillor for Gorse Hill Ward in Trafford – Gtr Manchester.

Embracing our shops

I’ve been looking at and talking to others about our local shopping parades. I don’t think Gorse Hill is particularly exceptional in this regard but we’ve got a lot of them both serving us from within the ward and from just outside.

  • Lostock Circle
  • Winchester Road
  • Lostock (Barton Road)
  • Derbyshire Lane West (Sevenways)
  • Park Road (Fiveways)
  • Third Ave (Trafford Park)
  • Moss Road
  • Davyhulme Road East
  • Gorse Hill Chester Road
  • Red Chippy Village / Bishop Blaize

Whilst there’s a lot of takeaways there’s also supermarkets, chemists, doctor’s surgeries, restaurants and independent specialist stores. Given we’ve also got Tescos and Lidl, not to mention that a lot us consider the Trafford Centre as within walking distance, it’s amazing that our local parades are still such a thriving sector here.

Our local shops have been crucial during covid and it’s incredible that they’ve kept open and stocked throughout. They’ve been on the frontline in terms of facing people, often unmasked and of unknown health risk. Let’s be honest, they’ve been heroes during the crisis and deserving of our thanks.

So it’s a good time to be looking at the general economic vitality of our parades and to begin a process of looking at what the council can do to support. We’ve seen their impact in a crisis but working together, can we get more positive value from these parades?

I think the conversation starts with the parades themselves and I’ve been talking to a small stretch of shops in Gorse Hill. Whilst I have managed to get the council to release a small sum of of £5000 to match fund improvement, it’s more to start the conversation than anything.

At this point, it’s really about understand the individual needs of shops and try to identify some common themes.

  • Quicker turnaround needed in processing changing terms of opening times, license etc.
  • Car access to forecourts, a lot of issues on this not necessarily a consensus but current situation of bollards at one end of row (outside doctors) and open at the other end near pub is not working. Three point turns are churning the forecourt surface creating trip hazards. Parking density (particularly matchday) is deterring customers on foot and reducing trade at peak.
  • Lighting and general amenity
  • Policing particularly with regard to drugs/alcohol abuse

It’s a conversation to continue and I would love to see the council / public health getting involved. These parades often define the neighbourhood, yet in terms of local authority involvement, it’s often a policing role, for example, not letting takeaways open at times they’d interact with school children. Perhaps approaching issues in a more collaborative mode would achieve more positive change.

I still want to talk to more of the businesses but I hope this has given a flavour of what I’ve been doing

Still no joy on Humphrey Park subway

Reply from Network Rail

“The details you provided were passed to our maintenance supervisor who has advised that a team will be in the area within the next 5-7 weeks and at this time, they will assess the site to understand what work needs to take place.

Due to current circumstances, our main priority is keeping the railway running for key workers and freight which means smaller jobs such as graffiti and fly tipping aren’t being prioritised like they usually would.

This being said, once the team have established the level of graffiti, the clearance will be added to their work bank to take place when resource is available.

It may also be worth raising this issue with Trafford Council to see what they can do to assist with the problem. If they contact us directly, I’ll be able to forward this on to the necessary team so the 2 parties (as well as Northern) can look at what options are available.”

Next Steps

I think it is worth talking to Trafford officers. There’s no question the subway badly needs investment. I’d really like to see it on the Bee Network schedule for walking and cycling investment. It’s not really been taken up by the local cycling forum, presumably because it’s seen as primarily a walking route. Somehow we’ve got to squeeze it onto the programme. The obvious solution is replacing the steps with a much longer gradient on both sides. This would actually make the station wheel chair accessible too.

So I’m inclined to pursue once Christmas is out of the way.